Sustainability Project: June 2020

For this month, I am writing about dishwasher detergent. I am #blessed to have my very own dishwasher at home. Since the coronavirus quarantine, I went from eating at home about two breakfasts, one lunch, and five dinners a week to seven breakfasts, seven lunches, and seven dinners a week. And that’s for four people. So it’s a ton of dishes. I would possibly be crazier by now if we hadn’t gotten the dishwasher installed last year.

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My younger son watching the koi outside the columbaria in Green-Wood Cemetery. Yes, I could have uploaded a photo of my dishwasher, but this is more interesting and also water-related.

Initially we used whatever name-brand product we found at the store for dishwasher detergent. But I started to look around for something else and found Dropps. You may know Dropps from their commercial featuring the CEO in a bathtub. That commercial is just for their laundry detergent, but they also have dishwasher detergent pods. They are free of dyes and fragrances and plastics and are shipped in compostable, carbon-neutral packaging. Having used them for about a month now, I will also say I’ve been able to eliminate the use of a rinse agent. These are better than the brand name combined with a rinse agent. As soon as I am out of laundry detergent, I will be trying this brand as well!

Continuing to Work on my Yard (all about soil)!

Last week I wrote about my trials and tribulations of getting the cement in my backyard taken away. That actually took place last fall. After the contractor finished moving away most of the broken cement, he said we would wait to do the next part until the spring.

While this was ongoing, I decided to test my existing soil. A few people warned me that it may contain heavy metals or other dangerous things, and I had to do that before I planted anything in it we would possibly eat. I didn’t have a solid plan as to what to plant yet, but I wanted to include the possibility that I would be gardening edible plants.

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These tiny tomatoes came from a plant I had in a pot last summer. I opened my shed in December and found these growing! And yes, they were yummy!

 

After several annoying and possibly hilarious attempts to test using kits I bought online, I discovered the NYC Urban Soils Institute. You mail them a soil sample, and for a reasonable fee, they test it for you and email you the results. The soil from my yard came back as lacking in biologic material but otherwise fine. I was so happy to hear it!

Through the Soils Institute helpful website, I found that the best way to amend my soil was by adding organic matter. I would add to need topsoil, because the level was so far below the cement, but the winter is not the time to do that. Since it was a mild winter, I started just adding organic material by burying my organic garbage. It sounds odd, but I was already bringing scraps once a week to be composted. This was even easier! Just dig a hole and bury them!

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In early February, I went for a walk and found this very early flower! I hope to have some in my garden this year.

A few people asked about animals digging it up, but we are vegetarians, so it was only fruit and vegetable scraps. I live in Queens, so the only animals about are stray cats, who wouldn’t want my scraps, and raccoons, who can easily find tastier stuff in garbage cans. I have never had a problem! And never will, since it is now spring and I stopped doing this because things are growing in the yard. More on this next week.

Another Earth Day (or Month) Project

Last April, I started making sustainability swaps, and I’ve both kept up with and continued to do these. So this April, one year after starting this, I decided to write about a big, drastic, and potentially even (a little) life-changing multi-month project.

This story starts more than seven years ago, when we bought a house. The house and having a washing machine inside it is great, but it also fulfilled a dream of mine of having my own outdoor space. Being in Queens, NYC, of course that backyard space is pretty small. And unfortunately, it was also 100% paved, and that cement had been put in about two or three years before we bought the house, so it looked brand new. I thought it would be stupid to bust it up when it looked that good. I tried to have plants in containers, but it never worked out that well, and I didn’t spend that much time out there, because it was bare and dull.

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I didn’t take an official “before” photo but this is indeed the yard before. Most of the cement is to the left, but just looks likes plain cement, so do we even need a photo?

Last fall, only a few days after having my older son’s birthday party in the yard, we busted up the cement! And when I say “we,” I mean paid contractors. I am not operating a jackhammer! I assume everyone knows concrete=bad, but maybe I am wrong. If you want to read about how bad cement is for the environment, you can start here. And personally I couldn’t finish this article because I started crying, but maybe you’ll do better.

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Dramatic photo mid-bust!

Anyway, it’s gone, and I’m so happy! But of course, this bare surface cannot possibly be the end product I was looking for. And it’s not, but I will save the rest of the story for next week.

Post MinsGame/Middle of Pandemic

This MinsGame month was the strangest by far. Even though I was trapped at home almost the entire time due to the pandemic, it was by far the hardest time I have ever had. I attribute it mostly to the lack of being able to focus. My nine-year-old son did a lot of it by himself, as I lay in the pits of ennui. Nevertheless, we were able to declutter quite a bit, which always makes me feel better.

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Beautiful flowering tree!

 

Life at the end of March looked very different from the beginning. I have not been to an inside physical location other than my own house since March 15th. Probably the next time I will do so will be in May. I know I am very, very lucky. I have always been able to do my job entirely at home. My spouse is in the same boat. Of course, now we also have to conduct a full day of school at home at the same time for two kids. That has been rough, but fortunately my older son has figured out how to do and submit most of his work himself.

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Huge tree just starting to bloom.

My outside space in the garden has been really great, as has the local hiking trail that starts only a few blocks from my house. We have started to wear homemade cloth face masks whenever we go out, in compliance with the CDC’s recommendations. None of us are sick, but so many people who have this are asymptomatic, so who knows? Better to be cautious than infect someone else who needs to be out, like healthcare workers or city employees. Another place I’ve gone is the cemeteries. Last Sunday was sunny and perfect weather, and I walked for two hours and didn’t see a single person. I was by myself, and realized I hadn’t been by myself in about a month. It was really peaceful, and I hope to go again soon.

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My flower identifying app says this is nettle. Such a pretty color.

 

 

MinsGame Spring 2020: Day 29

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Samir was especially amused at this report from when he was in kindergarten that says, “The sea can kill you.”

For the Minimizing Game Day 29, we (mostly me and my older son) went through three tubs of paper materials from school. We spent about three hours on this project, and while I think we have more to go before it’s totally sorted, we did get rid of an entire large recycling bag full of papers.

MinsGame Spring 2020: Day 23

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Nadim’s first day in kindergarten back in September. So sad he’ll probably never go back.

For the Minimalism Game Day 23, we have stuff I got rid of yesterday, but forgot to take photos. Today was the first day of distance learning for the kids, and I am uncertain how I feel about it. Despite all the minimizing, everything seems cluttered and crappy.

1.-7. I found a box of seven unopened baby wipes. I listed them on a local parent group for free and they were taken away in minutes.

8.-13. Formal kids clothing too small for Nadim.

14.-20. Some kind of toy race tracks Samir said won’t work with what we have.

21.-22. Broken hangers.

23. Garden hose that doesn’t hold water.

When Is a Fish Not a Fish?

Long ago, I was an apartment dweller, and wished I could get a large fish tank. But I did not, as I was afraid something would happen in the apartment and it would break or spill and the people under us would have stuff wrecked, and I don’t know. When we bought our house, I almost immediately got a 20-gallon tank and gradually, a bunch of fish. Samir was about three years old and enjoyed it as well. Actually, you can read all about it in this post.

So, yeah, I no longer had a fish tank. But years ago, before I had bought that 20-gallon tank, I also bought a small, 5-gallon tank, but never used it, because I wanted a bigger tank. That small tank was still in a box in the basement, and I took it out and set it up. Why did I do this? Samir still is upset about the fact that I got rid of the larger tank and had been asking for a Betta fish forever. It is a corner tank, and I realized I have a corner in my kitchen that goes pretty far back, so it’s not like you would use it for preparing a meal anyway. Plus, being the kitchen, it’s right near the sink, so cleaning the tank will be much easier.

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Samir gradually coming to the realization that a pet fish doesn’t do that much.

The two kids had a great time picking out the gravel and tank decorations, and of course the fish himself. For the first ten minutes or so, they were very excited about having a fish. Then they were way less excited about having a fish. Feeding time came, and they fought over the privilege to feed the fish. Then they fed the fish and soon were no longer excited to feed the fish. Eventually, we decided to name the fish, and Samir suggested Joey Ramone the Second, which was unanimously approved.

We’ve had Joey for about a month now, and the kids are mostly uninterested. Oh well. So much for my rule of, “If it’s your fish, you have to feed it and clean the tank or it will die.” I do enjoy watching him swim around while I cook dinner or do the dishes. And Bettas are pretty smart, so to cut down on debris in the tank, I’ve trained him to take individual pellets of food from my hand. A friend watched Joey swim up on my command, and said, “If you have trained a fish to eat from your hand, then that fish is clearly your fish.”

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When is a fish not a fish? When it’s Joey Ramone the Second!

Sustainability Project: January 2020

I am still attempting to slowing swap out environmentally unsustainable habits for more sustainable ones, but as time goes on, this grows more difficult, as I am running out of ideas. Please send me ideas, if you have them!

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Photos of paper towels are dull, so here is a photo of my younger son, climbing a tree (hey, it’s loosely related!)

For this month, I wanted to work on my use (or over-use) of paper towels. I am well aware that I use too many paper towels, and, once again, I think the problem is I was taught to clean using exclusively paper towels. Before this swap, I probably used a roll of paper towels a week!

In my efforts to cut down, I purchased reusable bamboo towels. I bought these over a month ago, and have only used about three each of the smooth and scrubby type. It says they can be washed in a washing machine, but I haven’t done that. I just wash in the kitchen sink until they look really disgusting, and then use for a final gross task and then throw them out. Usually this final gross task is my cat vomiting up a hairball. I imagine these two rolls will last about a year, which is a significant reduction in the amount of single-use paper in my house.

Thoughts on the MinsGame Fall 2019

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Two small things: My older son (short for his age) and a miniature donkey! Bonus alpacas behind them!

I’m not sure if this is my fourth or fifth time of playing the Minimalism Game, and it was probably the most challenging so far. Usually, I try to have a plan before the month starts, and I’ll focus on certain things, like kitchen cabinets I haven’t opened in three years, or the back room in the basement that everyone except me and the cat are afraid of. This month, I didn’t have a plan, but I did have a bunch of weekend plans. Since the weekends are usually when I would do most of this, and one long weekend I was camping for three days, I imagined horrific defeat. But somehow, I did it!

Some things I noticed this time: Usually I get rid of a ton of books, both from myself and my kids. But I went through so many last time that I could only muster up one book that I thought I would never read (and I’ve had it since the 1980s). I usually go through my kids books, but Nadim is just learning to read, so even the most infant-centered books will be helpful this school year. I also want to get the kids a new bookshelf, since the one they have now is the one I got from my parents when I was 17 (almost 30 years ago) and the legs are falling off. My mom bought it at Ames (a store that doesn’t exist anymore) for $20 and I guess it’s lasted way longer than anyone would have imagined. So when I do buy them a new bookcase, we will definitely go through every single book then.

I also wanted to completely clean out my shed, but because of it being a busy month and going out to the shed seems to require more effort than just looking through drawers, I only got rid of a few garden items. We are about to undertake a massive backyard renovation, so I will eventually do that anyway.

Will I play the Minimalism Game again? I think so. March and September seem like good defaults, so I will probably stick to that schedule.

Sustainability Project: June 2019

As I wrote sometime last month, I would like to keep up with the sustainability swaps, and do about one a month. It turned out I did something different than I was thinking about, as I ran out of coffee. Since this post is about coffee, I have to admit something: I have a Keurig.

I bought it a few years ago, after breaking every glass coffee pot I tried to make it work with. I don’t know why I have this problem, but I will also say that I am the only person in the house who drinks coffee from home on a regular basis, so most of the time, if I made a pot, it would go to waste anyway.

Now, of course, I wish I didn’t buy a Keurig. I was weak and annoyed at spending so much money buying single cups of coffee from various shops. But I feel terrible about all the plastic K-cups that go into the landfill. And I did try the kind of K-cup that allow you to peel off plastic part, and then that portion goes into the recycling, but it wasn’t great.

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This is the variety pack!

So after some searching, I found this company: Tayst. The beans are sustainably sourced and the pods themselves are 100% compostable!

The only downside to this plan is that I do not yet have a compost area, as when I bought my house, the backyard was paved. I do have a small front yard, and since coffee is good for plants, and I only drink about three cups of coffee a week at home (most is at work), I am wondering if I can’t literally just bury these little suckers and let them feed the tree that lives there? I plan to try this and see how long it takes them to break down. A possibly fun experiment?

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Just adding this photo of Samir from 7 years ago for fun–but note I still have the same coffee cup!